Like music to your ears: Listen to this audio segment by Changing Hands Bookstore on The Late Starters Orchestra by Ari Goldman, an “engaging story of second chances.” image

Fiction can help us understand our world, even - especially - the most difficult aspects. This Huffington Post list features 50 novels by women writers on conflict, displacement and resilience, including  In The Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez, Running the Rift by Naomi Benaron and Secret Son by Laila Lalami.

Readers of all ages can appreciate September’s Lucky Stars, all of which feature unforgettable characters at tender ages. Get your dose of youth with these e-books, all for $1.99 apiece this month!

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What was your favorite part of your high school yearbook? Why, superlatives, of course.

Oyster, the e-book subscription service is celebrating its first year with a book, obviously — a yearbook — with categories in the Oyster Yearbook ranging from Class Clown, to Life of the Party, to Biggest Flirt.

None other than our own The Girl Who Fell from the Sky by Heidi W. Durrow is nominated for Most Popular — cast your votes today!

Why Independent Booksellers Are on the Rise Again

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KEY BACKLIST What a week! I blink on Monday, then it’s Friday, 12:29 pm. At any rate, I would be remiss if I didn’t talk up choice oldies but goodies because, as we all know, even the most voracious reader in the world hasn’t read every title categorized as backlist. Nine times out of ten, I would bet most of your power patrons haven’t read even one entry in Agatha Christie’s classic Hercule Poirot mystery series, revived as of this week with the publication of The Monogram Murders, a Top New Release. The Cloud contains a couple dozen, including Five Little Pigs.

My first read of the fall, Maj Sjowell and Per Wahloo’s The Laughing Detective, book four in the Martin Beck private detective series and winner of the 1971 Edgar Award for Best Novel, has pulled out my eyes like a magnet, to paraphrase Elvis Costello. The characterizations are superb to the point of being 3-D, and the dialogue like tattoos I see on my arm. Sex, death, love, murder, and the Swedish welfare state: this is literature. Try it out on your patrons who don’t do genre fiction.

It’s back-to-school daze, and Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine, a 2013 young adult novel about two young Iranian women in love, came to my attention again when it won a slew of awards over the summer, first and foremost the Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Children’s/Young Adult. This is one for book groups and your teen and adult readers who love to plumb heartbreak and angst.

 Finally, we’re on the brink of National Hispanic Heritage month (September 15-October 15). Julia Alvarez, an Algonquin writer like Farizan, is a wonderful option to steep your readers in culture that is American, no question about it. 

Hungry for a good book? Gobble up B.A. Shapiro’s The Art Forger. Greenbrook Country Club sure thought it took the cake.Sweet.
(Hey, don’t be so frosting to our puns.)

Hungry for a good book? Gobble up B.A. Shapiro’s The Art Forger. Greenbrook Country Club sure thought it took the cake.Sweet.

(Hey, don’t be so frosting to our puns.)

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"Whiz-bang spy satire bundled in an edgy tale of redemption."

Publishers Weekly tabbed Brock Clarke's upcoming novel The Happiest People in the World  as its Pick of the Week.

Click here for the complete review.

“The High Divide is a vivid reminder of why we read, and why we want to.”
And if anyone can speak with authority about a novel set in the High Plains in 1886, True West magazine certainly can.

The High Divide is a vivid reminder of why we read, and why we want to.”

And if anyone can speak with authority about a novel set in the High Plains in 1886, True West magazine certainly can.

Book Riot’s riotously delightful Rebecca Schinsky shares the exciting arrivals in her book mailbox this week, including Tim Johnston’s Descent (at the 2:35 mark).